Forest Stories

A Resource Guide

A Resource Guide

A Resource Guide for Community Forests Introducing the Northwest Community Forest Coalition's Community Forest Handbook! Developed with input from coalition members across the region, this document covers community forest development from beginning to end.  Key topics include: Governance: Who gets to make decisions?Steps Required: How do you go from an idea to bringing a community forest into fruition?Finance and Funding: How do you align the available sources of public and private dollars to buy a forest?State and Federal Programs: An overview of programs that can support community forest acquisition. WEB_Community Forest Handbook Final Dec 2018Download

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Economic and Community Development through the Mt. Adams Community Forest

Economic and Community Development through the Mt. Adams Community Forest

Summary of results from the Economic Impacts of the Mt. Adams Community Forest: 2014-2017 Founded in 2004, Mt. Adams Resource Stewards (MARS) promotes sustainable connections between the land, local economies and rural communities in the Mt. Adams Region. From 2014-2017, MARS completed four timber harvests and three prescribed burns on MACF properties. These activities produced $610,000 in gross receipts and contracts. In addition, MARS leveraged its forest management expertise and management to secure stewardship contracts on the adjacent 7,000-acre Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge. These contracts resulted in a further six timber harvests and $1.1 million in gross receipts and contracts. Download the factsheet to learn more! Mt. Adams Economic Study Summary (PDF) Courtesy of: Economic and Ownership Analysis of NW Community Forests at request of Washington Department of Natural Resources September 2018

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Fact Sheet: Stemilt-Squilchuk Community Forest

Fact Sheet: Stemilt-Squilchuk Community Forest

In 2007, the Washington Department of Natural Resources and a private timber company proposed to sell over 6,500 acres in the heart of the Stemilt-Squilchuck watershed. In response, a broad coalition of stakeholders came together to develop a comprehensive vision for the future conservation and use of the region. Part of what emerged is the Stemilt-Squilchuck Community Forest (SSCF), with a focus on protecting critical water storage, improving vital wildlife habitat, and providing diverse outdoor opportunities to the Wenatchee area. Stemilt One-Pager (PDF) Courtesy of Economic and Ownership Analysis of NW Community Forests at request of Washington Department of Natural Resources September 2018

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Fact Sheet: Montesano Municipal Forest

Fact Sheet: Montesano Municipal Forest

The city of Montesano is home to one of the Northwest’s outstanding examples of a municipally-owned watershed under long-term sustainable forest management. Known widely as the “Tree Farm,” the Montesano Municipal Forest (MMF) not only generates significant revenue from timber harvest and serves as a recreational hub for the surrounding region, but does so while maintaining a commitment to responsible stewardship of fish and wildlife habitat. Montesano Municipal Forest One-Pager (PDF) Courtesy of Economic and Ownership Analysis of NW Community Forests at request of Washington Department of Natural Resources September 2018

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Fact Sheet: Indian Creek Community Forest

Fact Sheet: Indian Creek Community Forest

Nestled on the shores of the mighty Pend Oreille River, the Indian Creek Community Forest (ICCF) is a place where ecosystem protection and restoration supports a growing educational community hub, and a place to communicate the varied stories, history, and culture of the landscape for generations to come. Indian Creek Community Forest One-Pager (PDF) Courtesy of Economic and Ownership Analysis of NW Community Forests at request of Washington Department of Natural Resources September 2018

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Fact Sheet: Nisqually Community Forest

Fact Sheet: Nisqually Community Forest

In response to concerns over the ecological and economic impacts of recent timber harvests and a growing interest in local forest ownership and management, a diverse group of stakeholders came together in 2010 to develop a shared vision for the future of commercial forestry in the Upper Nisqually River Watershed. What followed was an ambitious plan to develop a community forest that improves and protects fish and wildlife habitat, promotes local jobs through sustainable timber management, and provides diverse recreational and educational opportunities. Nisqually One-Pager (PDF) Courtesy of Economic and Ownership Analysis of NW Community Forests at request of Washington Department of Natural Resources September 2018

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Fact Sheet: Arcata Community Forest

Fact Sheet: Arcata Community Forest

Started in 1955, the Arcata Community Forest (ACF) has developed into a project that is recognized both nationally and internationally for its ability to protect and enhance local forest ecosystems, generate significant local jobs and revenue, and build vibrant local communities through education, recreation, and participatory management. Arcata Community Forest Factsheet (PDF) Courtesy of Economic and Ownership Analysis of NW Community Forests at request of Washington Department of Natural Resources September 2018

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Case Study: Chimacum Ridge Community Forest

Case Study: Chimacum Ridge Community Forest

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2ARYX61LSM&feature=youtu.be[/embed] There is a new community forest in the works on the Olympic Peninsula. This video from the Washington Environmental Council and the Jefferson Land Trust highlights the progress that has been made toward the creation of the Chimacum Ridge Community Forest. For more information about this project and how to get involved click here.

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Profile: Mike Kaputa, Stemilt Community Forest

Profile: Mike Kaputa, Stemilt Community Forest

The Stemilt Community Forest brings together Chelan County Name: Mike Kaputa Affiliation: Stemilt Community Forest   1. What first drew you to forestry work? The opportunity for the County to purchase lands to protect ecologically diverse forestlands from development and partner with neighboring landowners and stakeholders to create the Community Forest was an exciting and unprecedented event for Chelan County. The obvious connection between this forest and the community that depends upon it was the force that drew us into the realm of community forestry. The importance of keeping this contiguous forestland intact to protect the needs of the community in terms of agricultural water supply, high-quality outdoor recreation, and protection of sensitive wildlife species was what really drove the momentum toward the Community Forest. 2. What is your favorite attribute of the community forest you’re affiliated with? The Stemilt Community Forest supports complex ecosystems and a variety of wildlife…

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Profile: Justin Hall, Nisqually Community Forest

Profile: Justin Hall, Nisqually Community Forest

Managing for the all the benefits of a forest Name: Justin Hall Hometown: Olympia, Washington Community forest affiliation: Nisqually Community Forest 1. What first drew you to forestry work? As an undergraduate I received Bachelor's degrees in Wildlife Science and Fisheries Biology. I then worked for the University of Washington Charles Lathrop Pack Forest as a forester which led to a Master’s degree in Silviculture and Forest Planning. I've always loved being in the woods and working in them just seemed like a natural extension of what I enjoyed. That said, I've spent most of the intervening time in office settings running a nonprofit. 2. What is your favorite attribute of the community forest you’re affiliated with? My grandfather moved to Washington from the east coast during World War II to work in the timber industry and as it turns out he worked on the same forest that we are…

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Profile: Tom Tuchmann, US Forest Capital, LLC

Profile: Tom Tuchmann, US Forest Capital, LLC

A forest finance aficionado shares tips for bringing projects to fruition Name: Tom Tuchmann Hometown: Portland, Oregon Affiliation: US Forest Capital, LLC   1. What first drew you to forestry work? Like many working in this field, I was inspired by spending time in our nation’s forests and wildlands at a young age and wanted to see them conserved. Within this context, I was drawn to forestry because it essentially serves as the liberal arts of the sciences. Meaning, working in forestry provides exposure to biology, ecology, hydrology, economics, business, policy and planning, and wood products manufacturing among other disciplines. If you know forestry, there is a good chance you can conserve forests. 2. What is your favorite attribute of the community forest you’re affiliated with? My work is focused on helping both existing and new landowners achieve their community forestry acquisition and management objectives. As a result, we are affiliated with numerous…

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Case Study: Stemilt-Squilchuck Community Forest

Case Study: Stemilt-Squilchuck Community Forest

Project Location/Community Supported by the Forest The greater Wenatchee, WA, metropolitan area, population 50,000+, plus visitors enjoy the use and values of the forest. Project Description Chelan County owns and manages the 4,000 acre Stemilt-Squilchuck Community Forest acquired from Longview Fibre Timber Co. In 2007, Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced plans to sell four sections of public land in the upper reaches of the Stemilt basin into private hands. While these lands were no longer a management priority for DNR, they were of tremendous value to the local community. The four sections and the surrounding landscape are the heart of the Stemilt-Squilchuck watershed, providing critical water storage and production functions, recreational opportunities, and important wildlife habitat and resources. The privatization of these lands would put all of these values and more in jeopardy. Additionally, the Longview Fibre Timber Co. proposed to auction off over 4,000 acres adjoining the…

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Profile: Jay McLaughlin, Mt. Adams Resource Stewards

Profile: Jay McLaughlin, Mt. Adams Resource Stewards

Daring to imagine a new future for forests and people Name: Jay McLaughlin Hometown: Glenwood, Washington Community forest affiliation: Mt. Adams Community Forest and Klickitat Canyon Community Forest Trust property [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXalm7wF-vk[/embed] Rural Reinvention: Mt. Adams Resource Stewards, Glenwood, WA   1. What first drew you to forestry work? I have always had a love for the outdoors and originally thought I would become a wildlife biologist. Somewhere along the way I took a silviculture course framed as applied ecology, and I was really intrigued by the challenge of using our understanding of ecological systems through forest management to achieve whatever outcome we desire. 2. What is your favorite attribute of the community forest you’re affiliated with? Of the properties we own and manage, the Pine Flats Tract of the Mt. Adams Community Forest resembles a classic east slope Cascades, dry mixed conifer forest. I love the plant communities there. We've…

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Profile: Cherie Kearney, Columbia Land Trust

Profile: Cherie Kearney, Columbia Land Trust

The Columbia Land Trust’s go-to conservation champion shares her best practices Name: Cherie Kearney Hometown: Washougal, Washington Affiliation: Columbia Land Trust   1. What first drew you to forestry work? I live in a region where everyone is connected to and has an opinion about forests and forestry. Here, there are wide ranging views and values about our forests, how they should be managed and who and what should reap the benefits. What drew me to forestry work is the challenge and reward of negotiating toward commonly held values around this vital resource. 2. What is your favorite attribute of the community forest you’re affiliated with? The fact that in a setting wracked with opinions, disagreement, economic stress, emotion and lawsuits over how forests are or should be treated there is prevailing agreement that a community forest is good idea. 3. From your perspective, what is the most important benefit…

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Case Study: Assessing Community Forest Potential in Washington and Montana

Case Study: Assessing Community Forest Potential in Washington and Montana

Enabling Conditions and Barriers to Community Forest Development in the Pacific Northwest Introduction In June of 2016, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) initiated the Community Forest Study in collaboration with faculty and post-docs at the University of Washington (UW) School of Environmental and Forest Sciences and University of Montana (UM) College of Forestry and Conservation. The purpose of the study was to provide preliminary information relevant to the possible development of community forests on TNC’s properties in the Blackfoot River Valley of Montana, and the Central Cascades and Olympic Rainforest regions of Washington. Study goals included  gain a better understanding of the three properties and the human communities around them, conduct a survey of community forests nationally to learn how they operate, and begin to understand enabling conditions and barriers that could influence the development of community forests in these project areas. This report provides a summary of findings from Phase…

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